Is young children’s passive syntax semantically constrained? Evidence from syntactic priming.

Description

Enter a short description of this experiment. It's useful to explain what this experiment measures, what stimuli are used, and how participants respond. Also consider including any information about limitations or restrictions on the use of this experiment

These materials relate to a pre-registration of the paper that will be

Darmasetiyawan, I.M.S, Messenger, K., & Ambridge, B. (20xx). Is adults’ passive syntax semantically constrained? A pre-registered replication of Messenger et al (2012).

In this study, we will replicate Experiment 2: Theme–experiencer primes vs. experiencer–theme primes from

Messenger, K., Branigan, H. P., McLean, J. F., & Sorace, A. (2012). Is young children’s passive syntax semantically constrained? Evidence from syntactic priming. Journal of Memory and Language, 66(4), 568-587.

(1) We will test only adults (18+), rather than (in the original study) adults and children; native speakers of British English. (2) We will recruit 240 participants, rather than (in the original study) 24. Simulations based on the original raw data from Messenger et al (2012) and reported here found that 240 participants are required to yield at least 95% power for detecting a significant effect of the cruicial interaction (PrimeTypeP:VerbTypeTE') – Point estimate = 100%, 95 Confidence Interval = (83.16, 100.0). (3) We will run the study entirely online using the Gorilla platform

Participants take turns with a (virtual) experimenter to describe pictures, with some trials forming a "snap" game. For full details of the method, see Messenger et al (2012).

These materials are provided under a CC BY-NC 3.0 License - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/?utm_source=www.domtail.com - Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. We require that you cite the original Messenger et al (2012) and, if appropriate, also the Darmasetiyawan et al replication. NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes. No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits

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Information and Consent

This is just the information sheet and consent form

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Snap task

This is the main syntactic priming task - Please see the complete experiment "Syntax Priming" for details

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Syntax Priming

Description

Enter a short description of this experiment. It's useful to explain what this experiment measures, what stimuli are used, and how participants respond. Also consider including any information about limitations or restrictions on the use of this experiment

These materials relate to a pre-registration of the paper that will be

Darmasetiyawan, I.M.S, Messenger, K., & Ambridge, B. (20xx). Is adults’ passive syntax semantically constrained? A pre-registered replication of Messenger et al (2012).

In this study, we will replicate Experiment 2: Theme–experiencer primes vs. experiencer–theme primes from

Messenger, K., Branigan, H. P., McLean, J. F., & Sorace, A. (2012). Is young children’s passive syntax semantically constrained? Evidence from syntactic priming. Journal of Memory and Language, 66(4), 568-587.

(1) We will test only adults (18+), rather than (in the original study) adults and children; native speakers of British English. (2) We will recruit 240 participants, rather than (in the original study) 24. Simulations based on the original raw data from Messenger et al (2012) and reported here found that 240 participants are required to yield at least 95% power for detecting a significant effect of the cruicial interaction (PrimeTypeP:VerbTypeTE') – Point estimate = 100%, 95 Confidence Interval = (83.16, 100.0). (3) We will run the study entirely online using the Gorilla platform

Participants take turns with a (virtual) experimenter to describe pictures, with some trials forming a "snap" game. For full details of the method, see Messenger et al (2012).

These materials are provided under a CC BY-NC 3.0 License - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/?utm_source=www.domtail.com - Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. We require that you cite the original Messenger et al (2012) and, if appropriate, also the Darmasetiyawan et al replication. NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes. No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial (CC BY-NC)


Mic Test

This just tests the participants' microphone (necessary for recording audio responses)

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Preferred Citation Messenger, K., Branigan, H. P., McLean, J. F., & Sorace, A. (2012). Is young children’s passive syntax semantically constrained? Evidence from syntactic priming. Journal of Memory and Language, 66(4), 568-587.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4996337/
Conducted at University of Edinburgh, University of Warwick, University of Liverpool
Published on 02 October 2019
Corresponding author Prof Ben Ambridge Psychology
University of Liverpool